Metallium, Inc.



Element Coin History and Descriptions

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Element 1st Issue Date Typical Weight Packaging Tarnishing and Corrosion: Special Handling Cleaning: Other facts
Aluminum April 2006 1.1 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Aluminum and Copper were the first coins of this series issued by us. They were the easiest and cheapest to make.
Copper April 2006 4.0 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Aluminum and Copper were the first coins of this series issued by us. They were the easiest and cheapest to make.
Gadolinium May 2006 3.4 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Will corrode when exposed to moisture Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will darken the metal. To our knowledge, this was the FIRST EVER coin made from Gadolinium, or any of the rare-earth series of metals! It was a difficult metal to work with since it is somewhat brittle and tough to work into sheet form for punching blanks. Our success with this metal paved the way for several other metals in the series. The metal will sometimes show it's brittleness with rough edges on the rim. We haven't found any chemical cleaner that works on this or any of the other rare-earth metals, in fact any attempt to clean gadolinium just darkened the surface.
Gold May 2006 3.1 grams (1/10 Troy Ounce) Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Thin coin can bend under pressure Typical jewelry dips For Gold and certain other precious metals we decided to make the weight of the coin equal to exactly 1/10 of a troy ounce. The gold coin thus will be thinner than the standard size of the coins in this series. The Gold coins are struck from blank planchets. The reverse side of these coins have a spectacular cartwheel luster.
Zinc June 2006 3.1 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Easy to strike and look very nice.
Niobium June 2006 3.7 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Fairly easy metal to work with and looks very nice with a deep shine that will last indefinitely. We have also produced beautifully colored coins of this metal with the anodizing process.
Molybdenum June 2006 4.4 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable -- -- Molybdenum was the hardest metal we had worked with up to this point. The first batch had fairly weak strikes but we got better at it. The metal can laminate, or peel apart on itself under the high pressure of striking and rolling. A few of these coins may show a split on the outside rim.
Magnesium June 2006 0.7 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Will corrode when exposed to air or moisture Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Magnesium gave our mint operator fits! The metal sticks to the dies when struck. The Magnesium coin needs to be stored in its airtite container otherwise it will eventually corrode if exposed to open air.
Tin June 2006 3.1 grams Coin Flip Stable Soft metal - easy to bend -- Tin is very soft and while the coins were easy to make, they should be handled lightly as they are easy to bend. The coin surface will stay shiny indefinitely.
Cadmium June 2006 3.7 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Toxic metal - Keep in Airtite holder -- Cadmium is known to be toxic and thus should be kept in its airtite holder at all times. With that said, the coins look very nice and should not tarnish. To our knowledge, this is the first coin ever struck from this metal.
Palladium June 2006 3.1 grams (1/10 Troy Ounce) Coin Flip & Airtite Stable -- Typical jewelry dips For Palladium the weight of the coin is exactly 1/10 of a troy ounce. The Palladium coin thus will be thinner than the standard size of the coins in this series. These coins have a brilliant shine that make them stand out when compared to the other metals in this series.
Vanadium July 2006 2.6 grams Coin Flip Will turn slightly blue over a long period of time -- -- Vanadium is a rare and expensive metal, thus the higher price. After a long search, we were able to find a source of the metal, which is difficult to find in pure form. Vanadium has a slight bluish color and will develop more of a light aqua/blue color as it slowly tarnishes over the years.
Indium August 2006 3.1 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Very soft metal - VERY easy to bend! -- Indium is so soft you can impress it easily with your fingernail. You could easily cut the coin in half with a pair of scissors or a knife. So, handle it at your peril - we bent quite a few of them ourselves before we learned our lesson! To our knowledge, this is the first coin ever made from Indium.
Lead August 2006 4.9 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Will darken over time Soft metal - easy to bend -- Lead is soft like tin so it should be handled lightly to avoid bending it. Lead will lose its shine if exposed to open air and will darken, so it should be kept in its airtite holder. The metal will eventually darken over a fairly long period of time even in its airtite holder.
Hafnium August 2006 5.5 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Very hard metal to work with. The strikes are rather weak and shallow but we hope to get a more powerful coin press in the future. Struck with maximum available pressure. Heaviest metal we had worked with up to this point.
Iron August 2006 3.4 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Will rust in water or humidity Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture -- Pure iron was tough to find in sheet form for making blanks and was rather expensive. The coins are very shiny and have nice surfaces. Keep it in its airtite holder or it will rust on exposure to high humidity.
Nickel August 2006 3.7 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- For us, nickel was actually much cheaper than pure iron. These coins are very nice and will never corrode or tarnish.
Ytterbium Sept. 2006 3.0 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Will corrode when exposed to moisture Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Our most exotic offering up to this point and most certainly the first coins ever made from this unusual metal. Ytterbium is one of the rare-earth metals and has a slight rich-looking golden color. The coins have a beautiful cartwheel luster and smooth rims. Ytterbium can corrode in moist air or finger oils so it should be kept in its Airtite container. The metal drives our mint operator crazy since it sticks very well to dies, die collars and most other metal surfaces that it comes in contact with, including itself.
Titanium Sept. 2006 1.9 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- A tough, hard metal that actually was fairly easy to work with. Will not corrode or tarnish.
Silver Sept. 2006 4.5 grams Coin Flip Will tarnish if sulfur present Hold on rim only Typical jewelry dips Very shiny as silver should be.
Zirconium Sept. 2006 2.8 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- The hardest, toughest metal we have worked with up to this point, harder than hafnium or molybdenum. The first strikes didn't make much of an impression but we eventually got it right. The strikes are still somewhat weak so we're hoping to improve on that in the future.
Gallium Oct. 2006 2.5 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Will melt on a warm day or in your hand! -- When we started making these we used a unique molding process since it melts at 86 degrees F. The liquid metal was injected into a mold containing the image dies and cast in its final state. Soon aftwerwards we were able to strike them with a similar process used for other coins, but we still have to be careful not to allow the metal to melt during the entire process of making them.
Tantalum Nov. 2006 7.2 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Tantalum is very heavy and it's density can be felt by holding this coin in your hand. Very shiny appearance, one of the best of the series.
Yttrium Nov. 2006 1.9 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. To our knowledge, another first-ever coin issue made from this rare-earth metal. Has a nice shine and shows it's brittle properties through rough edges.
Bismuth Dec. 2006 4.2 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Brittle - will chip easily - handle delicately -- We didn't think a pure Bismuth coin could be made because the metal is brittle. But were we surprised! Bismuth will shatter into crystalline pieces when hit with a hammer but under the controlled action of coin striking it stays intact and makes beautiful coins. Possibly a first-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Antimony Dec. 2006 2.8 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Brittle - will chip easily - handle delicately -- Our success with Bismuth (see above) led us to try pure Antimony and again we were pleasantly surprised! Antimony is more brittle and crumbly than bismuth so more care is needed when making and handling these coins. Antimony coins have been made in the past, but most probably as an alloy. The rims on these coins will show some chipping due to the brittle nature of the metal.
Platinum Feb. 2007 3.1 grams (1/10 Troy Ounce) Coin Flip & Airtite Stable -- Typical jewelry dips The most expensive metal we've worked with so far. These coins are the thinnest we will most likely make. They are thin because like gold and palladium, we decided to control the weight at exactly 1/10 troy ounce. Since platinum is more dense than gold or palladium, this coin is thinner than either of those two metals. Like the gold coin, these are struck from bullion coins. The obverse is very shiny and the reverse has a nice cartwheel luster.
Neodymium March 2007 2.9 grams Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode over a few weeks when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Neodymium is our first attempt at the so-called reactive metals. The coins are relatively easy to strike but the tough part is keeping the coin from tarnishing. Neodymium and other reactive metals will tarnish in air within minutes or hours and must be permanently sealed in glass and under vacuum to keep the coin shiny. We were finally able to develop a reliable process for sealing these coins in glass capsules. The coin in the glass capsule must be handled with extreme care - any impact from dropping it could crack the glass and ruin the seal. If the glass were to crack the coin would eventually completely corrode into a fine pinkish powder over several months. The glass capsule is shaped to resemble the outline of the standard Airtite holder as best as possible. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Samarium March 2007 3.2 grams Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode quickly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. The Samarium coin is sealed in a glass capsule like Neodymium. The metal will tarnish in air within a few weeks and must be permanently sealed in glass and under vacuum to keep the coin shiny. The coin in the glass capsule must be handled with extreme care - any impact from dropping it could crack the glass and ruin the seal. If the glass were to crack the coin would eventually start to corrode and turn a gray/black color. The glass capsule is shaped to resemble the outline of the standard Airtite holder as best as possible. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Terbium March 2007 3.5 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Terbium is a stable rare-earth metal that is one of the scarcer metals in the rare-earth series. It is slightly magnetic, more so than Holmium but still fairly weak. Comparing Terbium with holmium, gadolinium, erbium and other magnetic metal coins easily shows the difference in magnetic attraction of each metal. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Holmium March 2007 3.8 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Holmium is a stable rare-earth metal that falls in the middle of the rare-earth series in terms of scarcity. It is slightly magnetic, noticeably less so than gadolinium or iron. It is barely attracted to a regular magnet but will be noticeably attracted to a powerful Neodymium magnet. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Erbium March 2007 3.9 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Erbium is a stable rare-earth metal that is about as scarce as Holmium. It is slightly magnetic like Holmium and Terbium. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Dysprosium April 2007 3.7 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Dysprosium is a stable rare-earth metal that is about as scarce as Holmium. Somewhat magnetic, in between Gadolinium and Holmium. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Selenium April 2007 2.1 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Brittle - will chip easily - handle delicately -- Selenium was a unique challenge to make into coins. The exact process we developed is proprietary, but it is definitely not coined in the usual manner. The coins have a nice black, sometimes mirror background and full rims. This is the first non-metal to be offered by us in coin form.
Praseodymium May 2007 2.9 grams Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode quickly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- Praseodymium metal is quite reactive and will tarnish in open air within a few hours. To keep it shiny the coin is permanently sealed in a glass capsule under vacuum. If the glass seal is ever broken the coin would eventually completely corrode to a pale green oxide powder. The glass capsule is shaped to resemble the outline of the standard Airtite holder as best as possible. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Scandium May 2007 1.3 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable -- -- Scandium is the most expensive metal in the rare-earth group by weight. The metal is very light, so the coin is one of the most lightweight coins we have made, being almost as light as aluminum. Scandium has a unique appearance to it in terms of the slight yellowish color, and the crystalline structure of the metal which shows itself in the wavy appearance of the surfaces and rims. Very bright and shiny metal. The metal is quite hard and durable considering it's light weight. First known issue of this metal in coin form.
Lanthanum May 2007 2.7 grams Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode quickly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- Lanthanum metal is quite reactive and will tarnish in open air within about 1 hour, turning a deep blue color first. To keep it shiny the coin is permanently sealed in a glass capsule under vacuum. If the glass seal is ever broken the coin would eventually completely corrode to a white oxide powder. The glass capsule is shaped to resemble the outline of the standard Airtite holder as best as possible. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Cerium June 2007 2.9 grams Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode quickly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- Cerium metal is quite reactive and will tarnish in open air in a few hours, turning a gray color. The natural shiny metal color is a steel-gray color that is quite different than lanthanum and praseodymium, its closest neighbors on the Periodic Table. To keep it shiny the coin is permanently sealed in a glass capsule under vacuum. If the glass seal is ever broken the coin would eventually completely corrode to a gray oxide powder. The glass capsule is shaped to resemble the outline of the standard Airtite holder as best as possible. First-ever issue for this metal in coin form.
Cobalt Aug. 2007 3.8 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Cobalt is a very hard metal. It is used in metal cutting blades due to its hardness. We found out how hard the metal was when we did an initial test strike. The image came out OK but the rims were very choppy. After further testing, and using a more powerful coin press, we finally were successful with making a presentable coin for sale. The strike may be on the weak side so we will be steadily trying to improve on that in the future. It will complete the group of magnetic elements - iron, cobalt, nickel and several rare-earth metals.
Thulium Aug. 2007 4.0 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Thulium is a very expensive metal so we needed to make a large investment to make these possible. Thulium is especially difficult to ultimately make into a coin because of the difficulty in casting the metal into an ingot. When thulium metal is melted it vaporizes very easily, requiring a tightly controlled casting process.
Lutetium Aug. 2007 4.3 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid moisture Do not attempt cleaning! All known methods will corrode the metal. Lutetium is a very expensive metal so we needed to make a large investment to make these possible. Lutetium metal is rather hard and is difficult to work with, hence the high price.
Calcium Oct. 2007 0.6 grams Long Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode quickly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- Calcium proved to be much more difficult to keep shiny while sealing it in its glass capsule. Partly for that reason, the glass capsule needed to be longer than the glass-encapsulated coins issued so far. The metal is very lightweight (lighter than magnesium). The method developed in sealing this metal is also used for Europium.
Europium Nov. 2007 2.3 grams Long Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode rapidly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- The last rare-earth metal to be made into coin form, and the most difficult. Europium metal is very reactive and will tarnish within minutes when exposed to air. The metal coin surface will show a green-blue color which so far has been unavoidable.
Beryllium Mar 2008 0.8 grams Coin Flip & Airtite Stable Keep in Airtite holder, avoid direct handling of coin -- Beryllium is a very hard metal considering how lightweight it is. Known as a toxic metal in powder or dust form, it is reasonably safe in solid form like this coin. Nevertheless, the coin should be kept in its Airtite holder and should not be handled directly. Since Beryllium metal requires special safeguards during cutting operations, we have the blanks made for us by a qualified fabricator of beryllium metal products. A special variety is also offered that uses a polished blank to produce a coin with a better shine.
Chromium June 2008 3.1 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- We avoided chromium for a long time because the metal is hard and brittle. Once a process was developed to make the blanks though, striking them was relatively straightforward. The coins are sturdy and will retain their shine indefinitely, however the metal is hard and brittle and should be handled with care. Dropping it on a hard surface may cause it to chip or break.
Sulfur June 2008 0.9 grams Coin Flip & Airtite (other options to be released at a later date) Will tarnish other metals if exposed to them Keep in airtite, avoid handling coin directly, very fragile -- Developing a process to coin sulfur was tricky and took longer than expected. The coins are nice and show good detail. The standard version is in an Airtite and coin flip. The coin is very delicate, especially around the rims so extreme care should be taken if you decide to take the coin out of its Airtite holder. In addition, the sulfur itself may give off vapors that can tarnish certain metals coins around it (like silver), so it should not be stored with other coins. A test is currently ongoing to see if the sulfur coin will tarnish a silver coin nearby. To eliminate this possible problem a variety is offered whereby the sulfur coin is encased in clear plasttic resin, allowing it to be stored in an album or with other coins.
Thallium Oct 2008 5.1 grams Resin Casting & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode rapidly when exposed to air Safe to handle in clear resin - do not damage resin -- Thallium metal is soft and easy to strike, but it is reactive and very toxic which made this metal a challenge. The first coins have been struck and encapsulated in clear resin to protect the metal sample from corrosion and the owner from exposure to the toxic metal. Since the metal is so toxic the standard issue will be a clad version with thin thallium foil struck onto a lead blank. The amount of thallium in the clad version will be just tenths of a gram to minimize the amount of toxic material contained in the coin.
Barium May 2009 1.5 grams Long Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode rapidly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- Barium is the most reactive metal coined to date. The coin shows exposed metal surfaces and may be partly shiny with a few darker spots. The process to make the coins and seal them in glass is complex and time consuming.
Phosphorus May 2009 0.4 grams (mixed with binder) Resin Casting & Coin Flip Safe within resin casting Safe to handle in clear resin -- The red phosphorus coin is sealed in clear resin because the coin itself is too fragile to place in an air-tite. This was the biggest challenge to date - the end solution was to add a binder material to keep the red phosphorus coin intact long enough to cast it in clear resin. The coin is struck with the normal coining process from red phosphorus powder mixed with the binder material. This technique is also applied to certain other elements, see below.
Rhodium May 2009 5.3 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- Rhodium coins are very difficult to make but we finally found a way to reliably make them. The metal is hard and fairly brittle making metal forming difficult. In addition to being one of the most expensive metals in the periodic table, the amount of manufacturing time to make the coins results in a high price. First issue is standard thickness, a 1/10 troy ounce variety may be offered in the future.
Carbon Aug. 2010 0.4 grams (mixed with binder) Resin Casting & Coin Flip Safe within resin casting Safe to handle in clear resin -- After trying to strike graphite carbon into coins, it was decided to offer it in the similar format as red phosphorus - powdered carbon mixed with a binder and then encased in clear resin. When the coin is struck, it holds together but is extremely fragile which is why it is encased in resin to make it durable. Tests will be done in the near future see if an alternate process can be used to make standalone carbon coins. Carbon itself is too brittle to be struck into a coin.
Boron Aug. 2010 0.2 grams (mixed with binder) Resin Casting & Coin Flip Safe within resin casting Safe to handle in clear resin -- Boron amorphous powder is used mixed with a binder to make these coins, which are then encased in clear resin. The coin itself is extremely fragile which is why it is encased in resin to make it durable. Tests will be done in the near future see if an alternate process can be used to make standalone boron coins. We have tried pressing pure boron powder into a coin and they did not hold up at all.
Tellurium Aug. 2010 0.7 grams (mixed with binder) Resin Casting & Coin Flip Safe within resin casting Safe to handle in clear resin -- Tellurium powder is used mixed with a binder to make these coins, which are then encased in clear resin. The coin itself is extremely fragile which is why it is encased in resin to make it durable. Tests will be done in the near future see if an alternate process can be used to make standalone tellurium coins. We have tried pressing pure tellurium into a coin - the material proved to be too brittle.
Mercury June 2011 5.9 grams Resin Casting & Coin Flip Safe within resin casting Safe to handle in clear resin -- A capsule of liquid mercury is safely sealed within a clear resin casting with the equivalent coin-weight of mercury in it. These are extremely rugged - one was tested by literally throwing it on a cement floor repeatedly and it only chipped along the edges with no leakage of mercury. To more closely resemble the rest of the coin series, a method will be tested to see if the coin pattern can be cast in resin and then filled with liquid mercury to make it look like a pure mercury coin.
Strontium June 2011 1.1 grams Long Glass Capsule & Coin Flip Will tarnish and corrode rapidly when exposed to air Handle glass capsule very carefully, it slips easily out of the hand. Cracking the glass will eventually ruin the coin. -- Strontium was made possible by the success of the barium coins - however at the time of release it was not possible yet to keep the strontium shiny as it is sealed in glass. Ongoing efforts will be made to make these more shiny. The current version shows a pinkish/orange color with some of the cartwheel luster visible.
Rhenium TBD 9.1 grams Coin Flip Stable -- -- With the success of Rhodium, rhenium now looks fairly possible though it will be more difficult. We will continue testing on this metal along with iridium.
All the remaining elements… ???????? -- -- -- -- -- So, what about the remaining elements? Nothing is off the table yet. Some like Tungsten are too hard to strike with the normal coining process, but we are looking at other imaging methods to produce Tungsten coins and coins of other hard metals like Iridium and Rhenium. We may also start sealing the gases in the glass capsules being used for reactive metals. Stay tuned as we march through the Periodic Table....

What metals or elements would you like to see in coin form? Alloys? Let us know by email!


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